African Ancestry to tour six African countries

Dr. Gina Paige, Co-Founder and President of African Ancestry

African Ancestry, pioneers of genetics ancestry tracing for people of African descent, has announced that it will help African-Americans tour six African countries to trace their roots.

This will be after establishing their ancestry and birthright through a DNA test.

The initiative which is dubbed African Ancestry Family Reunion (AAFR), seeks to bring back all Africans in the diaspora who seek to trace their ancestry to its roots and home countries.

In an interview with Dr. Gina Paige, Co-Founder and President of African Ancestry noted that in her experience over the past years, the first thing people want to do once they find out what country and what people they share ancestry with, is to travel home “and now we have an opportunity to help them do that.”

Dr. Paige described the ancestry discoveries as an all-inclusive specially curated birth right journeys just for people who have taken the test to travel home either to Sierra Leon, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Senegal or Nigeria.

“This is really a journey, a birthright journey for people to learn the country, learn the history, the cultures, the traditions from the people who lived there that they have distant ancestry connections to” she emphasized.

It is necessary to trace your ancestry to where your great grandparents, aunts and uncles and other extended family members came from because we are the original victims of identity theft. As black people living outside of Africa, we have no idea where we are from.”

Earlier this year, over 70 families discovered their ancestry during the African Ancestry DNA reveal, which is the largest ever in the continent.

AfricanAncestry.com used its most comprehensive database of indigenous African genetic sequences in existence to trace their ancestry back to specific present-day African countries and ethnic groups of origin dating back more than 500 years ago – the only company that can do that.

Cumulatively over a million people, per the AfricanAncestry.com database have found out where they were from.